Anniversary of April 24, 1914 Earthquake in Reno—TODAY

Read this 2006 report for details of the April 24, 1914 earthquake [M6.1 ± 0.3] that hit the Reno area.

The November 21, 1910 Tonopah Junction Earthquake, and the February 18, 1914 and April 24, 1914 Reno Earthquakes in Nevada
by Craig M. dePolo and Terri M. Garside (Open-File Report 2006-02)
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/1910-Tonopah-1914-Reno-EQs-p/of2006-02.htm

“The April 24th earthquake was the largest event in the 1914 Reno earthquake sequence, and it was the largest earthquake in the United States that year. The nighttime earthquake (12:34 a.m. PST) caused damage in Reno, and was felt as far north as Winnemucca, as far east as Elko, as far west as Berkeley, and as far south as Randsburg in California; it might have been felt even further out if it had occurred during the daytime. People were awakened from their sleep as far away as the Great Valley in California, and in Sacramento, people rushed to the streets from buildings in their nightclothes. At least five aftershocks were felt through the night following the mainshock; earthquakes were also reported on April 25 and 26, which were either aftershocks or possibly related to a second earthquake source area to the south, closer to Virginia City.”

The earthquake was most severe at University Hill knocking down two chimneys at Manzanita Hall, leveling two chimneys at Lincoln Hall, and toppling the stack on the Hatch building. Glassware was broken and instruments were upset in the physical and chemical laboratories. At least one residence lost several square meters of plaster in a bedroom, had a chimney shaken to its foundations spilling bricks, and had a broken window. In Virginia City, people who were up dashed into the streets, pictures were jarred from the walls, dishes were thrown from shelves, and plaster was broken from ceilings of some residences.”

Seismic Hazards in the Reno-Carson City Urban Corridor
by Craig dePolo (Nevada Geology, Spring 1992)
http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/_docs/Newsletters/nl14.htm

“The Reno-Carson City urban corridor has one of the highest seismic hazards in the state of Nevada. Historical earthquakes are often the most convincing evidence of a local seismic hazard, and the Reno-Carson City urban corridor has had several damaging historical earthquakes.”

Living with Earthquakes in Nevada
by Craig M. dePolo, Lucy K. Jones, Diane M. dePolo, and Susan Tingley
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Living-with-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp027.htm

This handbook identifies the earthquake threat to Nevada and reviews earthquake safety, how to be prepared for earthquakes, and mitigation of hazards from shaking and fault offset.

Be PreparedJoin the Shakeout!
https://www.shakeout.org/nevada/

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